24. Beaufort to Beaufort

Due to excessive Thanksgivinging, I am taking this week off from blogging. I’ll be back next week with huge bells on. I promise. For now I am posting a few of the pictures I took and some abbreviated blurbs to keep you updated on where we were/are.

High quality will return next week.

 

 

 

Monday 20 NOV

Today we awoke early, prepared the boat and sailed on the Pamlico Sound from Ocracoke to the Nuese River. For much of the day we were followed by Curlew, the boat with four kids (14 and younger), but at some point they stopped and we lost sight of them. We anchored in South River for the night. Very quiet.

 

Tuesday 21 NOV

Today there is very little wind plus we have narrow channels to go on, so we motor all the way down the Adams River to Beaufort, NC. We arrive at the Town Creek Marina in the early afternoon and put the boat into a slip. We normally eschew this luxury, but we will be leaving the boat here for the week and want it watched and secured while we are away.

In the late afternoon we walk to downtown Beaufort. Normally, this would be a short walk, but the local bridge is being repaired and the detour lengthens the walk to about 3 miles. This is actually ok as we need some exercise. Plus, this way we get to see more of the town, including parts that tourists wouldn’t see. At first glance, Beaufort is a charming southern town with a seemingly long history given the age of the houses and their scale. The part we walk through to get to the waterfront is less affluent, but, because of its character, is a really interesting way to understand the place. In town we reach Front Street where there are a lot of restaurants and shops along a waterfront boardwalk. Alongside the street, in the water, are several rows of boat slips lining the entire street. This is an awesome place to stay in a boat, provided your pockets are leaking cash. The last time we looked though, ours were not. We eat a meal at a burger place on the water, have a couple of beers, and then walk a bit before deciding to get Emily to come pick us up and take us back to the marina. Sure she drives for Uber, but by the time we’re back, we are old friends. Look her up if you come to town.

 

Wednesday 22 NOV

We rent a car from Avis in Morehead City. We feel lucky to get a Jeep Patriot instead of the econo-car we actually ordered. Just kidding. Is this what the rental car companies think we’re saying in our blogs? On the way to H-ville, we take a short detour to Ikea in Charlotte to pick up a gift of knives-that-actually-cut for Glenn’s mom. We get to Hendersonville at 7:45, a full 15 minutes ahead of schedule. Pretty good for being on the road for +/-10hours. Glenn’s brother, Dean, his wife, Sherry, and Glenn’s mom, Linda, are, naturally, overjoyed at our arrival. For two minutes. Then we pick up where we were.

 

Thursday 23 NOV

For the three of us today is a low key day. All of the cooking is done by other people, except for the rolling of the crescent rolls (possibly the best part of the meal?), so we I hang out and drinking wine and knitting socks all day. Delightful. (By the way, I realize later that I didn’t take any pictures on the holiday. Somehow, I didn’t think of it… )

The meal is really good, by the way. The company is even better.

 

Friday 24 NOV

Dean, Sherry, and the three of us go for a post-feast hike in Pisgah Forrest. The walk was beautiful and the perfect length/height. The only drawback were the numbers of folks on that trail. Whew! Everyone in North Carolina had the same idea.

In the evening we open our new Cards against Humanity game and play with the family. This version is super trashy and I’m a bit more embarrassed than the last time we played with the Canadian set.

 

Saturday 25 NOV

The five of us go to Asheville for lunch and to be treated poorly by a hostess. Mission accomplished. As are the missions to buy a yarn, an overpriced shampoo bar, and spices for my chai addiction. Dean and Sherr leave to go home from here. And we don’t get to see the movie Lady Bird because all of North Carolina also wanted to see it.

 

Sunday 26 NOV

We drive back to Netzah in Beafort. It feel good to be home.

 

 

 

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Magnolia trees – only in the south. In Beafort we saw many mature ones, even in the yards of tiny bungalows. I love them.
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Beaufort stripes.
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Beaufort accommodation.
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In yellow.

 

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Looking fresh before the hike.
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post turkey hike trail – glorious
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Resting
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Really resting.

 

Asheville afternoon

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Good hair in Asheville
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These folks were giving out free hugs
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Freedom now
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selfie with turbans
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headgear
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cute family
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ugh, family
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more good hair
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“do you come here often?”

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Beaufort lights upon our return

6 thoughts on “24. Beaufort to Beaufort

  1. I thought about your Halifax entry this week. On Thursday night, the mayor of Boston and the Premier of Nova Scotia led the Christmas tree lighting ceremony in Boston Common.

    It was a particularly big ceremony, as this is the 100th anniversary of the explosion, and of the enduring friendship between Halifax and Boston.

    Like

  2. And here I thought being mentioned in a blog would change my life. Things would seem more magical, more other worldly, more important somehow. But sadly I wake up the same existentially challenged individual in its wake. Sigh.

    Like

  3. I’m not sure this ever got posted. On December 02, 2017 I wrote:

    I thought about your Halifax entry this week. On Thursday night, the mayor of Boston and the Premier of Nova Scotia led the Christmas tree lighting ceremony in Boston Common.

    It was a particularly big ceremony, as this is the 100th anniversary of the explosion, and of the enduring friendship between Halifax and Boston.

    Like

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